Intelligent Reasoning

Promoting, advancing and defending Intelligent Design via data, logic and Intelligent Reasoning and exposing the theory of evolution as the nonsense it is. I also educate evotards about ID and the theory of evolution one tard at a time and sometimes in groups

Thursday, December 11, 2008

A PRE-Natural Intelligent Designer

Thanks to my buddy Rich Hughes we have hammered out the proper adjective for the Intelligent Designer and the forces that brought nature into existence- Pre-Natural- as in before nature.

As Rich and I were bickering back and forth- as buddies are known to do- I came to realize that the designer of the cosmos cannot go beyond what does not yet exist. Therefore the prefix of super does not fit.

However, as Rich so rightly pointed out, the designer of the cosmos did come before the universe! And the prefix for before is pre-.

So I introduce you to the pre-natural intelligent designer.

If/ when the designer is caught violating the laws of nature we can then supersede the prefix pre-, with super-.

12 Comments:

  • At 7:35 PM, Blogger FreedomFighterXL said…

    Wow, it's about time Rich has made some contributions to the discourse on this topic. All I remember him doing was accusing me of executing a tornado in a junkyard fallacy before I even started calculating anything.....

     
  • At 8:27 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    Yeah Rich was trying to tell me that supercede meant "to come before others".

    I then pointed out the 1) the word is supersede and 2) the word PREcede means "to come before".

    The rest is now history...

     
  • At 7:31 PM, Blogger Rich Hughes said…

    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Meaning_of_the_prefix_super

    "The prefix 'super' means above or over, such as


    Supervise, to oversee or have oversight of
    Superior, bettter or above others
    Supercede, to come before others"

    Take it up with the author, Joe.

    And neither of you two clowns have calculated the CSI of anything, despite you trying to obfuscate ad nauseum. CSI of a baseball, Joe?

     
  • At 4:54 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    Rich,

    I know what the prefix "super" means.

    YOU did not.

    YOU said it meant "before all others".

    And the designer of the universe cannot be above or over the laws of natuer because those laws didn't exist.

     
  • At 4:57 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    Here Rich, Choke on your own ignorance:

    Richie being Richie

    One of the meanings of the prefix "super" is "Supercede, to come before others". So what came before nature would be supernatural.

     
  • At 5:00 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    And neither of you two clowns have calculated the CSI of anything, despite you trying to obfuscate ad nauseum.

    I have. It's easy- just COUNT the bits!

    CSI of a baseball, Joe?

    Find out what it takes to make one and count the freakin' bits you moron!

    And do you really think tat baseballs are not designed?

    That would be the only reason you would ask for its CSI.

    IOW once again you prove you are a useless tool.

     
  • At 2:12 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    Hey Richie- wikianswers is not an authority on anything.

    Try a REAL dictionary:

    Compact Oxford:

    supersede
    /soprseed/

    • verb take the place of; supplant.

    — USAGE The standard spelling is supersede rather than supercede.

    — ORIGIN Latin supersedere ‘be superior to’.


    Merriam-Webster:

    su·per·sede
    Pronunciation: \ˌsü-pər-ˈsēd\
    Function: transitive verb
    Inflected Form(s): su·per·sed·ed; su·per·sed·ing
    Etymology: Middle English (Scots) superceden to defer, from Middle French, from Latin supersedēre to sit on top, refrain from, from super- + sedēre to sit — more at sit
    Date: 1654
    1 a: to cause to be set aside b: to force out of use as inferior
    2: to take the place or position of
    3: to displace in favor of another
    synonyms see replace


    Cambridge:

    Definition
    supersede Show phonetics
    verb [T]
    to replace something, especially something older or more old-fashioned:

    Wiktionary:


    EtymologyFrom Latin super, over + sedere, to sit, via Middle French superseder, originally in the meaning "postpone, defer" (as Latin). The meaning "to replace" is from 1642, probably by association with precede. Original Latin sense: proelio supersedere statuit = he decided to delay battle — Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico, 2:8.


    [edit] VerbInfinitive
    to supersede
    Third person singular
    supersedes
    Simple past
    superseded
    Past participle
    superseded
    Present participle
    superseding


    to supersede (third-person singular simple present supersedes, present participle superseding, simple past and past participle superseded)

    (transitive) Set (something) aside.
    (transitive) Take the place of.
    No one could supersede his sister.
    (transitive) Displace in favour of another.
    Modern US culture has superseded the native forms.

    [edit] Synonyms(take the place of): replace, supplant, usurp

    Imagine that- Wiktionary disagrees with WikiAnswers.

    But anyway- anyone can take a look for themselves:

    One look dictionary's response to supersede

    IOW in all likelyhood, Richie Retardo was the author of the WikiAnswers page. Either that or tere are at least two really, really stupid people who have access to the internet.

     
  • At 2:17 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    In contrats you can also look up the word precede:

    verb: come before


    Encarta:

    Definition:

    1. come or go before something: to come, go, be, or happen before somebody or something else in time, position, or importance

    Merriam-Webster:

    pre·cede
    Pronunciation: \pri-ˈsēd\
    Function: verb
    Inflected Form(s): pre·ced·ed; pre·ced·ing
    Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French preceder, from Latin praecedere, from prae- pre- + cedere to go
    Date: 15th century
    transitive verb
    1 : to surpass in rank, dignity, or importance
    2 : to be, go, or come ahead or in front of
    3 : to be earlier than
    4 : to cause to be preceded : preface


    Cambridge:

    precede Show phonetics
    verb [T]
    to be or go before something or someone in time or space:


    IOW the ONLY reason Richie would be arguing such a thing is that he does not even understand the language he tries to use.

     
  • At 3:11 PM, Blogger Joe G said…

    Hey Rich,

    Check your wikianswer link for the prefix super again.

    They fixed it to reflect the commonly accepted definition.

    And you might also want to check out the definition of pre-:

    A prefix denoting priority (of time, place, or rank); as, precede, to go before; precursor, a forerunner; prefix, to fix or place before; preeminent eminent before or above others. Pre- is sometimes used intensively, as in prepotent, very potent.


    But thanks for once again providing us with entertainment.

    And thanks for demonstrating the strength of the theory of evolution. You show exactly what results from an accumulation of genetic mistakes.

    You should feel proud.

     
  • At 10:53 AM, Blogger Joe G said…

    The current laws of nature SUPERSEDED whatever came before.

    So if we apply Richie's and blipey's "logic" the current laws of nature are SUPER-natural.

    Is that what you were looking for?

     
  • At 12:38 AM, Blogger Joseph said…

    Wow, you guys are special. One thing to note though, is that time itself is a dimensional characteristic, and that any designer did not SUPERsede or PREcede or POSTcede or ULTRAcede anything. If a designer created the universe, he operates outside of time, therefore making your temporal vocabulary unnecessary.

     
  • At 7:52 AM, Blogger Joe G said…

    Only if time started with the origin of the universe.

     

Post a Comment

<< Home